Using Gifts in Advertising (part 3)

An advertiser offered a set of books to business men. The advertising was unprofitable, so he consulted another expert. The ads were impressive. The offer seemed attractive. “But,” said the second man, “let us add one little touch which I have found effective. Let us offer to put the buyer’s name in gilt lettering on each book.” That was done, and with scarcely another change in the ads they sold some hundred of thousands of books.
Through some peculiar kink in human psychology that names in gilt gave much added value to the books.

Many send out small gifts, like memorandum books, to customers and prospects. They get very small results. One man sent out a letter to the effect that he had a leather-covered book with a man’s name on it. It was waiting on him and would be sent on request. The form of request was
enclosed, and it also asked for certain information. That information indicated lines on which a man might be sold.

Nearly all men, it was found, filled out that request and supplied the information. When a man knows something belongs to them – something with his name on – he will make an effort to get it, even though the thing is a trifle.

In the same way it is found that an offer is limited to a certain class of people is far more effective than a general offer. For instance, an offer limited to veterans of the war. Or to members of a lodge or sect. Or to executives. Those who are entitled to any seeming advantage will go a long way not to lose that advantage.

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